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Guile: /ɡīl/ noun: sly or cunning intelligence. Oxford Dictionary In the Aeneid, Virgil describes the contentious arguments between Achilles and Odysseus on whether the Greeks should adopt a strategy of force or one of guile to defeat their antagonists in the city of Troy. Odysseus eventually wins, with the famous Trojan Horse ultimately successful in this epic battle. Similarly, in Milton’s Paradise Lost, Satan rejects the advice of his advisors and opts to deceive Eve rather than face God in a battle of force. The philosophical debate of guile versus force has faced us since the beginning of humanity and… Read the rest of this entry »


Posted by Robert Kozloski in Navy, Policy | 
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ATLANTIC OCEAN (May 17, 2013) An X-47B unmanned combat air system (UCAS) demonstrator conducts a touch and go landing on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). This is the first time any unmanned aircraft has completed a touch and go landing at sea. George H.W. Bush is conducting training operations in the Atlantic Ocean. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tony D. Curtis/Released)

I have found some of the responses to the latest announcement about UCLASS to be sadly telling about how little some have learned from the Age of Transformationalism that begat LCS, DDG-1000, and F-35. To me, the decision on UCLASS is a good news story about a focused and learning institution, but others seem slightly stuck between rage and disappointment when they realize that by the end of FY17 we won’t be launching sharks with lasers on their foreheads off the #3 catapult. First the announcement via Sam on Monday; The Navy’s Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) effort… Read the rest of this entry »


Posted by CDRSalamander in Aviation, Navy | 
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“Never paint over rust, it doesn’t solve the underlying issue — the rust. It may make the ship look better but only for a very short time; it fixes nothing; and you will only be fooling yourself.” — XO, USS Ramsey (DEG-2) to Ensign Crowder circa 1974. Wow, I haven’t seen the defense and Navy blogosphere light up like this in a very long time. Print newspapers, such as the Annapolis Capital Gazette are running daily front-page stories. What’s gotten everyone so worked up? Well, according to numerous media sources, the Secretary of the Navy has directed his two service… Read the rest of this entry »


Posted by Vice Admiral Doug Crowder, USN (Ret.) in Marine Corps, Navy | 
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This post appeared in its original form at CIMSEC. Week Dates: Feb. 22-28 2016 Articles Due: Feb. 21 2016 Article Length: 800-1800 Words (with flexibility) Submit to: Nextwar@cimsec.org Since we last discussed the Surface Navy’s operational concept of Distributed Lethality (DL) in July 2015, there has been a tremendous amount of progress on the topic. Distributed Lethality is the condition gained by increasing the offensive power and defensive hardening of individual warships and then employing them not only in traditional roles, but also in different ways than has been the practice in the past few decades. Distributed Lethality enables Naval Surface Forces to… Read the rest of this entry »


Posted by Ryan Kelly in Navy, Policy, Strategy, Tactics | 
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Please join us at 5pm EST on 31 Jan 2016 for Midrats Episode 317: “Naval Presence and National Strategy,” with Jerry Hendrix : From the same school as “If you want peace, prepare for war,” a global maritime power must maintain a presence at sea. It must design a national strategy in line with its economic capability and political will, and make sure it mans, trains, and equips its navy in line with the design. If presence is a critical function of a navy, how is it best accomplished, what are the tradeoffs, and how does it impact friends, competitors,… Read the rest of this entry »


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Experimentation is good and fine, but when is it time to take a cold view and say – that’s enough? In a time where we complain of tight budgets, are we throwing too much at one of the SECNAV’s pet projects? Via David Alexander at Reuters; When the Navy first tested biofuel versions of marine diesel and jet fuel in 2012, it spent eye-popping sums for small amounts. In one case, it paid $424 a gallon for 20,055 gallons of biofuel based on algae oil. To test the Great Green Fleet in the summer of 2012, it spent nearly $27… Read the rest of this entry »


Posted by CDRSalamander in Navy | 
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CAPT Cooper’s “Retaining Our Most Talented…To Fight And Win” is both exhilarating and empowering. As a SWO and Officer Recruiter (OR) for all 3 accession sources, provided are actionable recommendations to support PERS-41’s goals in front-end talent management. For USNA/NROTC, the first sales pitch is at grey hull cruise. Deep engagement is necessary and a responsibility that lies with the COs of ships. The Midshipman Early Ship Selection Initiative is on-target to emphasize this priority. Within Navy Recruiting Command, there are opportunities. The following are immediate impact changes that parallel the paradigm shift from ‘most willing’ to ‘most talented’ for… Read the rest of this entry »


Posted by LT Rolando Machado Jr in Navy, Training & Education | 
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Please join us at 5pm (EST) on 24 Jan 16 for Midrats Episode 316: “Getting Female Combat Integration Right With LtCol Kate Germano” How do we get combat integration of women right? The quest has moved well away from “if” and in to “how.” With an apparent broad disconnect between biological realities, cultural norms, and political desires, what is the right way for military leaders to carry out their orders while ensuring that combat effectiveness is maintained. Our guest to discuss this and related issues for the full hour will be Lieutenant Colonel Kate Germano, USMC. Commissioned in August 1996,… Read the rest of this entry »


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SAN DIEGO (Jan. 20, 2016) Sailors man the rails on USS John C. Stennis' (CVN 74) flight deck as it gets underway for a regularly scheduled deployment. Providing a combat-ready force to protect collective maritime interests, Stennis as part of the great green fleet is operating in the U.S. 3rd Fleet area of operations on a Western Pacific deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Patrick Enright/Released)

Over the past several months, senior naval leaders have highlighted the importance of organizational learning to accelerate innovation and adapt to future challenges. For instance, the SECNAV noted the confluence of people, ideas and information as the foundation of the DON’s Innovation Vision; Admiral Richardson introduced his concept of “accelerated learning” in A Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority; and LtGen Walsh unveiled the Marine’s “campaign of learning” in a speech at CSIS. However, many internal barriers must be addressed to fully implement their vision. The concept of a learning organization has been discussed in management circles for several decades. Yet… Read the rest of this entry »


21st

Dissent

January 2016

By

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The most dangerous threat to the safety and welfare of a nation is blind compliance. Nowhere is this more important than in the military where we have seen innumerable historical examples of the pitfalls befalling militaries unable to foster creativity and unwilling to accept change. In the last fifty years, the American military has so embraced indoctrination, discipline, and obedience that it has strayed from its most important cornerstone principle: the spirit of rebellion. Our heroes have demonstrated those most important components of a successful military: educated dissent and independent action. We are steeped in fear of an environment overtaken… Read the rest of this entry »


Posted by LTJG Alexis Anderson in Uncategorized | 
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