“Just the facts, Ma’am” – Sgt. Joe Friday….

An update from the USS Bataan’s website:

USS BATAAN, At Sea – The amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHA-5) received two MEDEVAC helicopters at approximately 8:15 p.m. Jan. 19, with three injured Haitians receiving immediate medical care from the Bataan medical team.

U.S. Navy and Coast Guard search-and-rescue crews responded to two separate distress calls in the vicinity of Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

An MH-60S Knighthawk from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 22 medically evacuated two patients with potentially life-threatening injuries just before a Coast Guard HH-65A Dolphin carrying a third patient arrived aboard Bataan.

FACT: This is 24 hours after arriving off of Port-au-Prince.

Meanwhile, the USNS COMFORT received their first patients while steaming enroute to Haiti according to Robert Little of The Baltimore Sun:

The Navy’s Baltimore-based hospital ship arrived close enough to Haiti to take aboard its first patients Tuesday night – providing urgent care to two severely injured quake victims transported from an aircraft carrier near Port-au-Prince.

Doctors were treating a 20-year-old man suffering from a spinal fracture and bleeding in the brain and a 6-year-old boy with a fractured pelvis.

The patients were brought aboard well before the ship reached its destination and hours after the crew had finished its latest round of training exercises.

I will let you decide.




Posted by Jim Dolbow in Uncategorized


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  • P.M. Leenhouts

    This is public relations, nothing more. Important? Not really. To name one minor issue, COMFORT didn’t have a flight deck loaded with helos and a well deck full of the critical elements of a MEU.

    http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/news/2010/01/mil-100115-nns05.htm

  • http://www.jimdolbow.blogspot.com Jim Dolbow

    public relations indeed – bad p.r. shame on the UN, Sate Department, USAID, government of Haiti for not utilizing the Bataan’s operating rooms sooner.

  • http://www.andrewlubin.com Andrew Lubin

    They’re barely using them now (Fri noon EST). Reports are that they’ve had all of 21 patients in total…surely with helos and landing craft returning empty, they can bring some of the many thousands of critical casualties with them.

  • UltimaRatioReg

    Here are some facts, Joe Friday. From Baltimore Sun. (H/T to SWMBO)

    “The team had touched down by helicopter at 7:30 a.m. on the same palace lawn where 60 or more patients were flown to the Comfort on Thursday. But Sharpe had taken only a few steps away from the helicopter’s spinning rotor when a U.S. Army officer told him that the landing zone was closed until 11 a.m. The United Nations was planning to distribute food and other aid on the grounds, and didn’t want the American military around, the Army officer said.

    Later, after hours of wasted time, the story changed. An Army officer said the landing area was closed out of concern that Haitians — including thousands in a nearby tent city — might think the Americans were taking over.”

    Yes, folks, the UN. Just the people we want to give a gazillion dollars to because they say the Earth is warming and it’s our fault.

  • http://www.jimdolbow.blogspot.com Jim Dolbow

    while I relish every opportunity to bash the UN and have worked for members of Congress that have voted to slash the U.S. contributions to the UN, what does this factual news article have to do with the Bataan’s idle operating rooms for the first 24 hours after its arrival off PAP earlier in the week?

  • UltimaRatioReg

    Jim,

    Empty helicopters lead to empty emergency rooms. Something to keep in mind for the next story about empty operating rooms afloat.

  • Jim Dolbow

    As noted by Defense Springboard, the Bataan’s lack of water was the reason for the idle operating rooms. Beam me up!

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