Since July, monsoon rains have caused heavy flooding in many areas of Pakistan. The United Nations estimates more than 20 million people are affected. In response the disaster, the United States has launched a civilian and military relief effort in the country. As part of that effort, US military fixed and rotary wing aircraft are ferrying people and supplies to and from the flood zone. Below are thirteen photos from that military response.

Please consider donating to the NGO flood relief effort here or elsewhere.

Caption: Amphibious assault ship USS Peleliu and amphibious transport dock ship USS Dubuque steam off the coast of Pakistan in the early stages of supporting the Pakistani government and military with heavy lift capabilities to bring relief to those affected in flooded regions of Pakistan. Peleliu and Dubuque are a part of Peleliu Amphibious Ready Group. Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Andrew Dunlap.

Caption: A forklift with bags of humanitarian assistance is loaded by Pakistani workers into a U.S. Marine Corps helicopter that has arrived to take over the flight role from the U.S. Army in the delivery of humanitarian assistance to the flood victims as part of the disaster recovery effort in Pakistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, Pakistan, Aug. 13. Photo by Staff Sgt. Horace Murray.

Caption: Pakistani Air Force members help unload thousands of Halal meals from a U.S. Air Force C-130H at Peshawar, Pakistan, Aug. 1, 2010. The meals will go to Pakistanis affected by the floods that have devastated the region. The C-130H is assigned to the 455th Air Expeditionary Wing at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. Photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Boitz.

Caption: Pakistani Air Force members help unload thousands of Halal meals from a U.S. Air Force C-130H at Peshawar, Pakistan, Aug. 1, 2010. The meals will go to Pakistanis affected by the floods that have devastated the region. The C-130H is assigned to the 455th Air Expeditionary Wing at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. Photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Boitz.

Caption: Pakistan civilians from the town of Kalam are gathered inside a U.S. Army Chinook helicopter which has come to deliver humanitarian assistance and pick up victims of the flood, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province (formerly North West Frontier province), Pakistan, Aug. 9, 2010. Photo by Staff Sgt. Horace Murray.

Caption: A member of the Pakistan military points in the direction to where the passengers from the U.S. Army Chinook helicopter need to go after being delivered to the town of Khwazakhela from the flooding, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province (formerly North West Frontier province), Pakistan, Aug. 9, 2010. Photo by Staff Sgt. Horace Murray.

Caption: A Pakistani military member assists a man and child during the evacuation process to board a U.S. Army Chinook helicopter to the town of Khwazakhela, during the flood recovery effort in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan, Aug. 11. Photo by Staff Sgt. Horace Murray.

Caption: Pakistan men from the town of Kalam form a chain to quickly unload a U.S. Army Chinook helicopter that has delivered humanitarian assistance and pick up victims of the flood, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province (formerly North West Frontier province), Pakistan, Aug. 9, 2010. Photo by Staff Sgt. Horace Murray.

Caption: Pakistan men from the town of Kalam carry a bags of flour, while they unload a U.S. Army Chinook helicopter which has come to deliver humanitarian assistance and pick up victims of the flood, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province (formerly North West Frontier province), Pakistan, Aug. 9, 2010. Photo by Staff Sgt. Horace Murray.

Caption: A little girl from who is evacuated from the town of Kalam wears a set of headphones to reduce the loud aircraft sound aboard a U.S. Army Chinook helicopter which has come to deliver humanitarian assistance and pick up victims of the flood, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province (formerly North West Frontier province), Pakistan, Aug. 9, 2010. Photo by Staff Sgt. Horace Murray.

Caption: U.S. Army Sgt. Kristopher Perkins, a Chinook crew chief with Company B, Task Force Raptor, 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade, TF Falcon, holds a child in his lap after picking up 114 Pakistan victims during flood relief missions, Aug. 11, out of the Swat valley, Pakistan. Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Monica K. Smith.

Caption: A U.S. Army Chinook helicopter flies over the flood affected area in Pakistan on a return flight from delivering hummanitarin assistance and evacuating personnel to the town of Khwazakhela, as part of the flood recovery effort in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan, Aug. 11. Photo by Staff Sgt. Horace Murray.

Caption: A Chinook helicopter waits at the end of the hangar holding supplies for disaster relief due to flooding, Ghazi base, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan, Aug. 7. Photo by Staff Sgt. Horace Murray.




Posted by Christopher Albon in Soft Power
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  • Shoaib Rehman

    THANK YOU US AND PAK ARMY FOR HELPING FLOOD VICTIMS.

  • http://nil imran tahir

    thanks US for helping my country in the time of need God bless america and pakistan .

  • Jim Dolbow

    Great post Chris as always!!

  • James Warm

    Deepest condolence to Pakistan.

    Pakistan please let God help you all. This is only one of the begining from the four winds.

    Repent yourself, we all ready to help.

    JW

  • eastriver

    Thanks, Chris — great images and story.

  • Poppy

    Thank you America.You have a good heart.May God Bless you,always.
    I am not muslim or Pakistani but my thoughts and prayers are for the poor desperate children.Its horrible whats happened and its so touched my heart that America is reaching out to save these people,in the form of your young soldiers,sailors and airmen.Thank you.

  • Khan Ilyas

    The floods triggered by monsoon rains in Pakistan have killed more than 5000 people (numbers will raise). More than ten million people have become homeless.
    While nature has been unkind it is important to see how responsible organization of Pakistan for prevention of floods has performed, so that improvements can be put in place to avoid similar disasters in future. I know during my stay in Pakistan, the Federal Flood for Commission Pakistan ( FFC) works under Ministry of Water & Power. FFC has rights to plan , monitor and execute flood control projects for effective management of floods. Since its establishment in 1976, it has spent Rs. 35.8 billion and $ 400 million (Rs 34 billion) on floods mitigation projects. Where has all this money gone?
    The recent floods have exposed the incompetence and corruption in this department. Chief Minster of Punjab after making inspections of many bogus or non-existent projects, especially in South-Punjab, ordered an inquiry at the highest level but federal government is still unmoved over the criminal negligence of FCC.
    The most serious and catastrophic devastating impacts of floods was faced in District Nowshera and Charsadda of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa. Huge sums of money has been spent here with nothing to show. one of the main culprits of the huge embezzlement is the Chief Engineer of FCC, Mr. Ahmed Kamal. He recently managed to get deputed as a Member, National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) and has also act as spokesman of NDMA.
    This very same person after looting billions of rupees has asked people to donate their money for flood victims. While donation flow in, it is important that the government punish people like him and others who have made this tragedy far worse than it ought to have been.

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