Last week, Al Jazeera English showed a 24 minutes documentary by filmmaker Vaughn Smith on American MEDEVAC crews in Afghanistan. The film is both an independent exploration of their mission and an emotional testament to their professionalism. It is a powerful film. It is more than just interesting to watch, it is important to watch.




Posted by Christopher Albon in Army
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  • Alexander Martin

    Incredible.

  • BJ Armstrong

    I have brothers who have served, and are currently serving, with the Navy’s 2515th Air Ambulance Detachment in Iraq. They are all incredible and do not get nearly the credit they deserve.

    http://www.army.mil/-news/2010/10/17/46678-basra-sailors-take-to-the-skies-to-save-lives/

    “So Others May Live…”

  • http://www.chaoticsynapticactivity.com xformed

    The last few moments of this film tells the story of one (and I’m sure of many in this work) who rise above the human condition. SGT Tyronne has an incredible outlook on life.

  • Moose

    My thanks to AJE for this, and Chris for posting it here. Wish our domestic media would do more to highlight the incredible men and women in uniform who save lives every day.

  • http://www.student-view-world.blogspot.com Bret

    One of the few good pieces by AJE.

    MEDEVAC crews are often forgotten sadly.

  • Matt Yankee

    Excellent post.

    SGT Tyronne’s mention of losing his marriage because of his service seems might be a signal of diconnect btw. military and civilians and a lack of understanding and unity from those unaware and comfortable at home. We need the media to get behind the effort and demand more support from families, civilians, Americans. Military leadership should demand forcefully and loudly to all… E pluribus unum. Quitting is really not an option as Sgt. Tyronne knows all too well.

  • Art Jacobs

    I was a Medevac pilot in Vietnam with the 1st Air Cavalry Division in 1968. It it marvelous to see that the tradition of “So that others may LIve” is being carried on by soldiers like Sgt Tyrone and the crew of his aircraft. It is also wonderful to see all the medical advances that are being used today. Medevac crews take every mission, no matter what because the guys on the ground know we will come, no matter what!

  • http://americanhuey369.com Alan J Walker

    WHAT A MOVING STORY OF HOW BROTHERS IN ARMS CARE FOR EACH OTHER. WE AS BROTHERS,SISTERS,PARENTS AND LOVED ONES SHOULD STAND PROUD AND BE EVER VIGILANTE TO THESE AMERICAN HEROES WHO LAY DOWN THEIR LIVES FOR FREEDOM. MAKE A PLEDGE AS I HAVE TO TELL EVERY SOLDIER YOU MEET EVERY DAY OF THE REST OF YOUR LIFE, THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE!!!!! THE LOOK ON THEIR FACES WILL FOREVER CHANGE YOUR LIFE!!!!
    Alan J Walker
    americanhuey369.com (PROUD PATRIOT)

  • http://www.vietnamdustoff.com Chester (Chet) Crump, SFC, Ret’d

    Does this ever bring back memories both good and bad. I was a flight medic in Vietnam ending after 600 + Combat Flight Hrs. I still have the smell of blood, burnt skin bone, in my nose and the takes of all of the same. It is a job that is definetely not for the person that has a weak stomach. The taste gets more real watching this video. It would have been nice for us to have had so much room in the back. Our drivers(GIF or Pilots) were the best of the best. Many LZ’s were not very conducive for landing a Huey but they did and many times were shot up.There is a moniker for helicopter folks Guns are for Fun, Slicks are for kicks, and DUSTOFF is for fools. Thanks Be to God that we haved had enough fools in military aviation for quiet a long time time now. God Speed My DUSTOFF Brothers and Sisters.

  • Bill Cook

    I was in the 571st DustOff from Nov 1967 to July 1968 had 275 Hr, 275 Mission in Vietnam.

  • Hugh Blackman

    Hi Bill,
    Great video, and thanks for your service in Vietnam.
    I came along a bit after you, and served as a flight medic with the 571st at Ft. Carson from ’73 to ’75.
    The 571st was one of the first M.A.S.T. units,and did all the civilian medevac in Colorado along with the 4ID medevac. In those days, there wern’t any civilian LifeFlights.
    Some of the guys I served with at Ft Carson had been with the 571st in Vietnam, around Phubai/Hui I think.
    Maybe you knew served with Gene Potter, Ken Hogan, or Lannie Stone.

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