Frank Buckles, the last surviving American veteran of the First World War, has died just weeks after his 110th birthday. Born 1 February 1901, Buckles had lied about his age to join the Ambulance Corps, where he served on the Western Front. He was one of nearly 5 million Americans who would serve in that war, a war in which 118,000 US servicemen would be killed in action in a little over seven months of combat.

Between the wars, Buckles found himself in the Philippines, where, in 1941, he was captured as a civilian by the Japanese. He spent three years as a prisoner of the Japanese before being freed. Read the rest of the story here.

And so America’s participation in the Great War, the unprecedented slaughter which perhaps more than any event still shapes Western consciousness, passes from the vivid color of eyewitness recollections of her veterans, into the sepia-toned images that populate the pages of history.

God rest the soul of Frank Buckles. His comrades await his presence no longer.




Posted by UltimaRatioReg in Army, Foreign Policy, History


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  • Victor Bosnich

    Thank you Corporal Buckles, thank you from the heart. I am sure you are with your band of brothers.

  • Mary Jane

    Rest in Peace Mr. Buckles…you were and are a great hero….Thanks David for making it possible for all of us to keep informed about Mr. Buckles…..we probably would not have known about him, had it not been for you…..What a service to our country both in WWI and after, with him trying to get the WWI memorial in Washington, DC.Keep up the good work. Condolences to Mr. Buckles family…he was a great man.

  • BUDD SANFORD

    WHAT A WONDERFUL DESTINCTION: THE LAST WWI HERO. GOD BLESS HIM. MY MOM IS A WWII HERO. SHE WAS THE PREFERRED PERSONAL SECRETARY TO GENERAL MAC ARTHUR WHEN HE WAS IN HOUSE IN THE PHILLIPENES. SHE TYPED UP THE BATTLE PLANS OF BATTAN, BROKE UP A GERMAN-JAP SPY RING ON INTUITION AND SPENT 2-YEARS IN A JAP PRISON CAMP (SAN TO THOMAS) WHEN SHE DID NOT HAVE TO.

    SHE WAS AN ARMY CHILD. SHE MARRIED MY DAD WHO WAS A CANADIAN. SINCE HE WAS NOT AN AMERICAN CITIZEN THE ARMY WOULD NOT ALLOW HIM TO LEAVE WITH THE OTHER MILITARY PERSONNEL. MY MOM REFUSED TO LEAVE HIM.

    GOD BLESS ALL THOSE WHO SERVE IN THE U.S. MILITARY. GOD D### ALL THOSE WHO MAKE IT NECESSARY.

    BUDD SANFORD
    LOS OSOS, CA

  • Patricia Caudill

    Than you Mr. Buckles for helping, perhaps, all of us here in the wonderful USA continue to live in this free country! It is with great sadness to learn of your passing, as this is the end and the last of those wonderful heros from WWI, who like those of the following wars, gave so freely to help preserve this country. I only hope that this reaches many teachers in this country, so that they may pass this information on to their students, who are now the future of this country. They need to learn about WWI and the lives of the heros,like you, that fought for this country in that war…gone, but not forgotten….

  • Karun Mukherji

    One day everyone has to die, harsh reality we all have to accept. With Buckle’s demise final link in America’s involvement in Great War has been severed. However Corporal lived for so long,led an action-packed life and saw so much history. Seldom will you find a person like him. His absence will be sorely felt. Centurion I salute you.

  • http://facebook Jenny Pivot

    WOW! Thank you Mr. Buckles and all your comrades! I wish they taught patriotism in todays schools. Bless your soul and the souls of all who have served and passed, there must be a special place in heaven for you guys to get together and share your memories.

  • Kiera Braun

    In memory of Mr. Buckles, Dr. Jeffrey S. Reznick’s article “Remembering Frank Buckles, the Last Doughboy of World War I” is being featured by the History News Network (http://www.hnn.us/articles/137055.html). Because of men such as Mr. Buckles, it is our duty to remember World War I–a more difficult task now that he is gone.

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