Archive for November, 2011

Dots, dots, dots. Everyone likes to play connect the dots, especially after the fact when it is nice and safe. What is thought clear in hindsight is often not hidden at the present – it is there. Not as clear as the monday morning GOFO would have you believe – but it is there.

Some see it – or at least bits of it. The final form is rarely known by many – and even up to the time of unveiling; except for those who execute it, doubt remains for most.

It was all there; the Tondern Raid, to Billy Mitchell, to the Attack on TarantoLCDR Genda wasn’t the only one to see it.

Examples abound. Big issues and small. Little things like RPG cages forgotten at the end of the Vietnam War until the Iraqi occupation. The South African Army vets from the Apartheid Era would tell all you needed to know about IED if you asked. We knew the vulnerability of the Humvee after Somalia in the 1990s – no excuse really for hillbilly armor over a decade later.

The World Trade Center was attacked once before 11 SEP 01. New methods from the Tactical, Operational, to the Strategic rarely appear as a bolt out of the blue. They are tried out. They are exercised – heck they are even written about and mentioned in conferences sometimes for decades prior to their explosion on stage.

All you have to do is listen. It’s there.

What are we moving forward on – what are our “long poles.” Networks, navigation, communication. Drones, UAS, off-site analysis. Reach-back.

NIPR, SIPR, VTC, broadband, UHF, EHF, downlink. Take you pick. What is your offline backup? How long will you be down? C4ISR – really? Complacent? Content? Assumptions? Branch Plan?

What worries? What warnings whisper at us?

Chinese hackers are suspected of grabbing the reins of four US government satellites in 2008 potentially crashing them to Earth or stealing valuable information, more than once.

NASA admits one of the two satellites was temporarily accessed twice in the summer and fall that year, though would not comment on the other.

‘While we cannot discuss additional details regarding the attempted interference, our satellite operations and associated systems and information are safe and secure’ NASA Public Affairs Officer Trent J. Perrotto said in a statement sent to Talking Points Memo.

According to the draft report, however, two satellites were infiltrated four times in 2007 and 2008 for 12 or more minutes.

Of course – what would divisions of battleships ever have to worry about a few canvas string bags with small little bombs? Don’t be silly. We have the war winning technology, don’t ‘cha know.

The socially awkward and their fetish-toys are not where serious career minded professionals invest their time. Leave those playthings for others; maybe those university libraries full of Chinese students is a place to put those silly ideas. We own the electronic spectrum and space anyway, right? What danger is there to all our transformational, network centric concepts.



7th

Chinfo Fail

November 2011

By

Navy’s Daily “ChInfo Clips” provides a synopsis of major articles of Navy interest.

Navy Times has a cover story on CO firings. Here is how the article led on in ChInfo Clips:

27. 7 Skippers’ Downfall
As alcohol ends still more COs’ careers, the Navy digs for answers
(NAVY TIMES 14 NOV 11) … William H. McMichael

The numbers don’t always tell the story. Navy statistics show the number of alcohol-related incidents in the fleet fell steadily over the past six fiscal years. But since the Navy also shrank during that time, the per-capita rate of alcohol-related incidents has remained relatively steady.
So the Navy’s alcohol problem is not going away. In fact, it might be getting worse. And nowhere is the problem more apparent than in the conduct of the Navy’s Amphib commanding officers.

Read that last line again…”Navy’s Amphib Commanding Officers”.

“Huh?” I say. Really? Something’s not right here.

So I emailed Bill McMichael, the author of the article.

Here’s his response.

That would be a gigantic mistake, but we didn’t do it. Chinfo Clips re-types rather than scans the clips, so someone mistakenly typed this. It did not appear in print this way. Here are the digits from our online version of the paper, which is identical to the paper.

Thanks for pointing this out. Hurts, tho. That makes me and us look stupid and it’s probably already taken on a life of its own. I’m asking Clips to do a correction but it won’t be out until tomorrow AM if they do.

Your Navy

As alcohol ends still
7more COs’ careers, the Navy digs for answers

skippers’ downfall

By William H. McMichael

bmcmichael@militarytimes.com
The numbers don’t always tell the story. Navy statistics show the number of alcohol­-related incidents in the fleet fell steadily over the past six fiscal years. But since the Navy also shrank during that time, the per-capita rate of alcohol-related incidents has remained relatively steady.

So the Navy’s alcohol problem is not going away. In fact, it might be getting worse. And nowhere is the problem more apparent than in the conduct of the Navy’s commanding officers.

So, Navy put out an article that incorrectly casts aspersions because someone manually retypes things. And it will take 24 hours to get a correction?

Wow.

But sadly not surprising.



Sunday afternoon, 5 pm Eastern U.S. (you did remember to change your clocks, didn’t you?) Eric Wertheim:

Eric Wertheim is a defense consultant, columnist and author specializing in naval and air force issues. He was named to the helm of the internationally acknowledged, one volume Naval Institute reference Combat Fleets of the World in 2002.

As author and editor, his duties include tracking, analyzing and compiling data and photography on every vessel, aircraft and major weapon system, in every naval and paranaval force in the world – from Albania to Zimbabwe. He leads an independent maritime intelligence effort that spans the globe to produce the book commonly known as “Combat Fleets.”

Frequently contacted by the news media for on-air interviews and background information related to international naval incidents, Eric Wertheim has served as a speechwriter for senior Pentagon officials and as a consultant to best-selling authors, publishers and nonprofit organizations. He has been instrumental in the advancement of numerous high-technology weapons and concepts, and from 1994 through 2004 Mr. Wertheim wrote the bimonthly “Lest We Forget” column on historic U.S. warships for the Naval Institute’s Proceedings magazine.

Since 2004, Eric Wertheim has written the monthly “Combat Fleets” column for Proceedings, and his annual review of world navies runs in the March issue of the magazine. He is the coauthor with Norman Polmar of the books, Chronology of the Cold War at Sea and Dictionary of Military Abbreviations, both published by the Naval Institute Press.

You can listen live by clicking here and finding episode 96. We go live at 5.

UPDATE: Direct link to the show here.

Or you can download the show later from the same site or from iTunes.



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